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Me and a Fast Car --Top 7 Early Killers of
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June 19, 2016
By L. Carr, Contributing Columnist







Being born a man puts you at an immediate disadvantage – at least in
terms of lifespan. Men can expect to live on average five years less than
women in the US, and seven years less worldwide.  Men stand out in
senior care homes for their novelty value.

We know this and accept it – but why exactly don’t men live as long as
women? What makes a man more likely to die early? Find out the
reasons why more men die young - and what you can do to beat the
killers that strike men at an early age.

What Age Does the Average Man Die?

The average life expectancy at birth is 76.3 for men and 81.1 for
women, according to the National Vital Statistics Reports 2011 from the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There has always been a
difference in life expectancy between the sexes but did you know that
the gap has actually
increased over the decades – and not in men’s
favor?

The gap started quite small due to the fact that average life expectancy
was low for everyone. But between 1900 and 1975 the gap in average
lifespan increased from men living 2 years less, to 7.8 years less.

The bigger gap is probably due to a rise in male deaths from heart
disease and lung cancer as men started smoking on an almost universal
basis.

The gap between the sexes narrowed after 1979 to 4.8 years, due to
the fact that more women started smoking and put themselves at
greater risk of heart disease and lung cancer. Medical advances helped
more men survive these killers.

Now the average man can expect a shorter lifespan by five years – and
the life expectancy rate is overwhelmingly affected by men who die
young.

Why Do Men Die Earlier Than Women?

Men start off at a disadvantage from pre-conception. The Y
chromosome is more prone to mutations than the X chromosome.

Since men have an XY chromosome (and women XX) any mutation on
the X is not “normalized” by the second X chromosome.  

X chromosome disorders are more common in men and include kidney
disease, spinal problems, and neurological disorders. Boys are more
likely to experience developmental disorders which can lead to health
problems.

Plus, you have to consider these facts.

Male suicides outnumber female across all age groups.

Men are more likely to die from homicide.

Men do not take as much care of their health as women, and often
refuse to visit a doctor.

Men are more likely to die from heart disease.

Men are larger than women and, in general, larger animals die younger
than smaller animals for a multitude of reasons.

And men are less socially connected than women, which can result in
high risk of death from mental health issues and even weakened
immune systems.

It’s sobering stuff. We took a closer look to reveal the top 7 early
killers of men – and to show you how you can reduce your risk of
becoming a statistic.





































1.
Excessive Risk Taking Means Men Die Earlier  

Men, studies show, take bigger risks than women.

Some experts believe the risk taking tendency comes from a slower
development of the frontal lobe of the brain – the section that affects
judgment – in men than women.

A greater tendency for risk taking affects work, relationships, and
health. In a 2012 study from the British Psychological Society,
researchers found that men were twice as likely as women to take risks
at work.

According to a 1999 study from the University of Maryland which
looked at data from 150 studies, men were more likely to engage in risk
taking behavior, and particularly in physical risk taking and intellectual
risk taking.

Some of the risks men take result in a greater likelihood of dying in an
auto accident, firearms incident, homicide, fight, or other act of violence
– and the issue is of greater significance in the US than in other
countries.

In 2016, scientists from Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of
Public Health discovered that 48 percent of the difference between the
death rates of men in the US than in other developed countries was the
fact that men in the US were more likely to die from
auto crashes, guns,
and drug overdoses.

2. Men Die from Heart Disease at a Younger Age

Heart disease develops seven to 10 years later in women than in men,
according to a 2010 study from the VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, in
the Netherlands.

Men are more likely to die from heart disease at a younger age, and are
more likely in general to die from this major killer.

The prevalence of coronary heart disease is higher among men than
women at all ages, apart from after the age of 75, according to a 2011
study from Columbia University Medical Center, New York.

Women are protected somewhat through higher estrogen levels, but
the differences may be due to lifestyle factors including men being
more likely to smoke and to drink heavily, and more likely to have
unmanaged high blood pressure  or high cholesterol levels.

3.
Men Commit Suicide More Often than Women

While depression is considered more prevalent among women, all the
statistics show that men are more likely to die from suicide.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of females and that
makes suicide the seventh leading cause of death among males, the
14th among females, says the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention (2013).

Could it be that men are less likely to seek help for mental health
problems? Or does the increased tendency towards risk taking mean
suicides are more likely to cause men to die young?

4.
Do Men Die Younger Because they Avoid Doctors?

Women under the age of 65 report going to the doctor more than men,
according to a 2006 study from the National Center for Health
Statistics, and the gap is widest among people aged between 18 and 44.

Men are less likely to schedule regular doctors’ visits, and are more
likely to skip health screens.

Women are also more likely to be under regular doctor care due to the
issues associated with reproduction and birth.

This makes it more likely that health concerns will not be discovered by
men until later, when the consequences are more serious.

5.
Alcohol is a Top Early Killer of Men

Men drink more alcohol, more often, than women, in general, say
studies like a 1998 report from the Prevention Research Center,
Berkeley, California.

Men are more than twice as likely as women to die from chronic liver
disease and cirrhosis of the liver. In total, around 62,000 men die every
year from alcohol-related causes, meaning this is the fourth leading
preventable cause of death in the US, according to Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention data.  

6.
And Smoking Is Even More Deadly For Men

Men are more likely than women to smoke – 19 out of every 100 adult
men (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

According to the 2000 study “Living and dying in the USA: Behavioral,
health, and social differentials of adult mortality”, smoking accounts for
25 percent of the sex difference in death rate – and it previously was
responsible for 75 percent of the difference.

More men smoking means more men die young from cancer,
respiratory diseases, and heart disease.

7.
Dangerous Jobs Kill More Men Young

Men, on the whole, work at more dangerous jobs than women. They
outnumber women in most of the riskiest occupations including the
military, aircraft pilot, logging, fishing, and construction work.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics' 2012 study shows that in the top three
most dangerous professions – aircraft pilot, fisherman, logger – most
positions were held by men.

In the fishing industry, workers died from workplace injuries at a 60
times greater rate than the average worker.

Other jobs with a higher rate of death than average, and also
dominated by men, include farming, roofing, and working with iron and
steel.













































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Men take more physical risks
throughout their lives.